Hurricane Irma and New Shop

Summer of 2017

Pottery Express and Bamboo Farm has unique items for your home and gardens on a 5 acre property that is scattered with idea gardens showcasing the tropical clumping bamboo and colorful garden pottery and statuary. Whether you are seeking a serene fountain, a single cobalt blue pot, a pair of matching pots for your front entrance, or a special focal point bamboo plant; this place sells what you are looking for.   


After surviving the recent monster storm Irma, we have to reminisce on our humble beginnings. Fill dirt from the county project of digging water ditches in the aftermath of Hurricane Charley was used to rise this beautiful farm up from a piece of swamp land. The business opened in July 2004 as an agricultural bamboo farm. We only sell tropical clumping bamboo that stays behaved in its 8 foot growth circle as opposed to the Northern running bamboo that takes over acres of property once planted. We instantly fell in love with the fact that clumping bamboo has so many varieties showcasing beautiful canes in varying size diameters and showy colors. We have chosen a selection of about 25 out of 1000+ species to carry on our farm to suit your needs, whether ornamental or for privacy hedging.    


Slowly, we brought in pottery from Mexico in the rustic clay pots and the brilliantly colored Talavera ceramics. The harsh summer sun and rainy season of Southern Florida made the Vietnamese durable pottery a natural addition to our offerings. Just the feel of the thick and pure clay used to form these pieces of garden art let you know that you can expect to enjoy this sturdy pot for many years with little effort. The beautiful color selections come with a thick glaze that has been high fired to seal the color to the molded clay. We have a long-term relationship with 2 families in Vietnam that produce the handmade pottery for us. Each order takes about 6 months of production time and ocean travel before it is delivered to Punta Gorda.   


Annual excursions to Mexico have resulted in meeting many more families producing folk art items that we are continually adding to our inventory. We value the relationships that we have built with our suppliers and they are very happy to have a way to distribute their creations. Generally, each family has developed a process of their craft that have been handed down for generations. We only buy Talavera from 3 families because they have the highest quality pots and the best painting. The quality is very noticeable when held in comparison to pottery produced by others that do not take as much pride in their craft.   


Recently, we have added several American made lines, such as doTerra essential oils, Fire Mountain jewelry, Case knives, Woodstock Wind chimes, and Henri Stonecaster fountains and statuary. We even have a local artist that will be demonstrating his hand thrown pottery craft and a display of his artful dishware for sale. 


The Torch, a local restaurant, will begin serving food on the farm a few days a week beginning in December. Call ahead if you want to be sure if food is available the day you plan to visit. The summer brought projects that expanded the covered shopping areas and we continually add new and interesting outdoor spaces to enjoy.    


Over 50,000 items set among the connecting warehouses and acreage give shoppers a fun day to venture out away from the shopping malls. We welcome you to just come out and spend time enjoying the beautiful landscape and zen feeling of the walking paths that meander throughout the property. We even have golf carts to help you explore the grounds. We are dog friendly, but do ask that you keep them on a leash, not only for their safety, but for the safety of our guests. Don’t forget to wear comfortable shoes to make exploring our farm and botanical gardens easier. In conclusion, we are so grateful that 2017 Hurricane Irma’s damage was more of a debris cleanup, instead of the structural catastrophic potential, so that the farm created from hurricane remnants 13 years ago, also survived a hurricane this year.